Alifiya Khan ,Jun 12, 2016,

Source : The Indian Express

It was a few months back when state education secretary Nand Kumar had instructed officials to keep a tab on institutions that deliberately detain students with low scores in Class IX.

After Class IX results, the education department has now trained its eyes on the first year junior college (FYJC) results. A couple of months after the department started keeping a tab on schools that deliberately hold back students in Class IX to achieve a 100 per cent pass percentage in Class X board exams, the department has now decided to study the results of junior colleges for the Class XI results to study if a similar attempt is made for achieving good results in the Class XII board exams.

It was a few months back when state education secretary Nand Kumar had instructed officials to keep a tab on institutions that deliberately detain students with low scores in Class IX. He had even warned of strict action if any intentional detention was noticed.

Following in the same footsteps, the deputy directorate of education, Pune, has decided to similarly monitor junior colleges as well. Speaking to The Indian Express, Meenakshi Raut, assistant director of education, Pune division, said that education officials in all the three districts attached to the division-Pune, Ahmednagar and Solapur-have been asked to collect the data of the last three years from junior colleges with regards to the number of students admitted, who appeared for exams and passed, along with details of scores of students who were held back.

“We were discussing the serious issue Class IX students being held back and it was decided that we would ask education officials to submit a report on the situation in schools. At the same time, it was decided that while we were monitoring the pattern for Class X exams, we should do the same for Class XII exams as well. Hence we have called for reports on both classes IX and XI results by next week,” Raut said, adding that if any colleges are found to indulge in such activities, an independent inquiry would be launched into it.

Raut said that instead of detaining poor performers in previous classes to improve board results, the institutions should focus on improving the quality of education. She added that an independent monitoring had been conducted recently to check the quality of teaching in junior colleges on several parameters.